Sunday Poem: Rain and Internet

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Back from two weeks in Madagascar, where travel during the rainy season is a challenge. The taxi-brousses, minibuses crammed to bursting with goods and passengers, average around 20 miles an hour. On the positive side, the people are so friendly that to focus on any niggling discomfort seems churlish. No blogging, of course, but as we all know, it does us good to disconnect from cyberspace for a while, doesn’t it? Although of course, knowing is one thing, accepting is quite another.

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This wonderful country, Madagascar,

Is now exceedingly wet.

But despite the rain, I’m sadder by far

Because there’s no internet.

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11 thoughts on “Sunday Poem: Rain and Internet

    • It is indeed good to disconnect and meeting such wonderful people is enriching in itself. There were coffee plants, vanilla, and ylang-ylang in abundance – but no cacao, I think. Mind you, I’m pretty hopeless when it comes to plants so I wouldn’t take my word for it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sounds like despite the rain, it was good 🙂

        So, no…you are not hopeless with plants at all — I mean how many can know about the ylang-ylang tree (native to my home country, The Philippines)! I was just telling someone the other day my top 5 favorite scents: 1. Citrus, 2. Rose. 3. The Sampaguita – a type of Arabian Jasmiine I think (and the Philippine “national flower”) 4. Gardenia (though this may be related to the Sampaguita and 5. The ylang-ylang tree flowers! Which was why it was oddly funny to see your post that they have ylang ylang in Madagascar

        There is a chocolate company growing and making chocolate in Madagascar, and posted here along with a bit of chocolate history in the Philippines at http://lolako.com/most-craved-food-in-the-world/

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thanks for that chocolate link – just reading it makes me wish I had some right now! Maybe I missed the plants themselves, but there’s certainly chocolate made in Madagascar, some of the best I’ve tasted.

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  1. There in itself lies the advantage – not only ignorance but also absence of Internet is bliss, especially for a country like this one
    where the inhabitants seem to be more in need of better housing, food, clothing besides healthcare! Thanks for the travel post with appropriate photos highlighting the daily routine during the rainy season!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re welcome – thanks for the thoughtful comment. There are indeed basic needs still to be taken care of in Madagascar, but the impression one gets is also of a potential for happiness that some more developed countries might envy.

      Liked by 2 people

      • You are welcome! Provided the potential for happiness is developed fruitfully making the inhabitants the real beneficiaries. But, the rate at which such countries and their inhabitants are exploited at the drop of a hat by the so-called developed countries and their agents makes it an unenviable situation!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! With the first glance I thought if you had been to India! This looks a lot like rain bathe villages of my homeland…the thatched huts, the muddy puddles, trees and everything. Thanks for sharing…I never knew Madagascar looks so different than the movie 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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